Pontoon Boat Anchor Size: Choose the Right One for Your Boat

Pontoon boats are one of the most popular types of boats on the market today. With your family, you may take them on leisurely cruises, fishing, or an afternoon of water skiing and wakeboarding. They also provide ample space for your extended family and friends to enjoy a day in the sun. Because of pontoon’s anchor size, they are a little more difficult to anchor than a fishing or ski boat. Because of their high profile, they catch the same wind speed, putting more strain on your anchor.

Anchor for pontoon boats is available in a range of designs and sizes. Boat owners, while having a boat anchor in your boat is necessary, selecting the best option is even more important. The size of boat anchor you’ll need for your pontoon boat will be determined by the amount of holding force you’ll need. The size of the anchor line is determined by the amount of holding force necessary, not by the size of the boat. Wind, current, and the type of bottom the anchor line will be put in all have an impact on holding power. Our tables, on the other hand, can help you determine the pontoon boat anchor Size and anchor rode length you’ll require.

Best 4 Pontoon Boat Anchors Types

There may have different types of anchors available for pontoon boats. Here we describe some best pontoon boat anchors.

Danforth or Fluke Anchor

The most common pontoon anchors are the Danforth or fluke anchors. It’s a compact, lightweight solution that may be simply stored. When the Danforth fluke anchors are pulled on, it comprises two triangular-shaped plates with pointy edges that anchor digs into the bottom. Because it folds flat and is easy to store, this kind of pointed flukes anchor is great for smaller vessels. The fluke anchor also has a lot of holding power for its size.

Mushroom Anchor

Mushroom anchors are another nice pontoon boat anchor. It’s a bit heavier than the Danforth, but it’s still manageable. The mushroom is spherical and has a hole in the center. Water pressure presses down on the hole when it’s put on the bottom, filling it up and causing the anchor to rest securely on the bottom. Because it is difficult to move about, this boat anchor is appropriate for pontoon boats that are maintained in one spot for most of the time.

Grapnel Anchor

For people who prefer to move about a lot, the grapnel style anchor or grappling, this anchor is a fantastic pontoon boat anchor. It’s the lightest of all the pontoon boat anchors, and it’s simple to toss from the pontoon’s bow. Multiple hooks on the grapnel anchor work and let it hold rocks or other things on the bottom. In sandy or muddy bottom conditions, this boat anchor does not hold as well.

Pontoon Boat Anchor Size

Plow Anchor

The plow anchor is a pontoon boat anchor with a lengthy history. It’s an excellent all-around choice that can be utilized in a variety of bottom situations. The form of the gravel plow anchors gives it its name. When pushed on, it features a curved blade that slices into the bottom. This boat anchor is a bit more difficult to store than the grapnel since it is heavier.

From different pontoon boat anchors, what type of anchor for pontoon boat anchor you pick will be determined by the size of your pontoon boat length and its weight. A mushroom or grapnel anchor may be the ideal option if you have a tiny pontoon boat. A fluke anchor or Danforth anchor will generally give the most holding power if you have a bigger pontoon boat.

Before deciding on a pontoon anchor, consider the following:

The anchor’s ability to hold

It may seem counterintuitive to find that the size and weight of your boat aren’t the most important factors in deciding the size of anchoring your boat need, but it’s true. The amount of wind and current in the body of water where you will be pontooning, as well as the kind of bottom (sand, mud, pebbles, etc.), all affect how much holding strength your anchor will require. To discover the size of anchor your boat need, use our Anchor Size Calculator.

The holding capacity of one anchor for a pontoon is given precedence above its size and weight. For reasons I’ll explain later, a larger anchor will not always hold a large pontoon boat better than a much smaller anchor.

The sort of anchor

When it comes to an anchor’s holding strength, wind and water current aren’t the only environmental elements at play. The holding strength of an anchor is affected by the bottom of the body of water in which it is anchored. Lakes and ponds can have a variety of bottoms, ranging from the rocky bottom and gravelly to deep mud or fine sand. This is why there are many sorts of anchors intended for optimum holding and pull force in various types of bottoms.

The weight of the anchors

Many anchor makers and retailers sell their products based on the weight of the anchor. For beginner boaters, though, this is a little deceiving. The holding capacity of the anchor is far more essential than its weight.

Having said that, while the anchor’s weight is less crucial than its holding strength, the weight of the anchor is still something you should consider, but for a different reason.

If you frequently boat in regions where you don’t require a lot of holding strength, having a heavier spare anchor is beneficial. Why? Because the right anchor’s weight will assist you in dealing with any unexpected windy weather that arises while out on the lake, it will help you offset any odd gusts of wind.

Pontoon Boat Anchor

The amount of ride required for the anchor

You’ll also need an anchor rode in addition to the anchor. Your boat’s ride is the line that links it to the anchor. It’s critical to select the right rode size and type for your pontoon boat anchor. The boat length and weight, as well as the depth of the water you’ll be pontooning in, will determine the size of rode you’ll need. Your choice of the rode will depend on personal desire. Chain, rope diameter, and a combination of the two are the three major forms of anchor rodes.

Choosing the Right Pontoons Anchor Size

Now that you’ve learned about the many types of pontoon boat anchors, it’s time to figure out what size is the best anchor for your pontoon boat. Consider the following as a starting point:

  • Your pontoon boat’s length
  • The volume of water in your pontoon boat
  • What is the estimated number of individuals that will be on board?
  • The environment you’ll be anchored in (e.g., wind, current, bottom type)

You can pick the right size pontoon boat anchor for your needs by using the information below.

20 to 25 Feet Pontoon Boat

The weight of such pontoon boat anchors will be roughly 2500 pounds. The following are the best choices:

Anchor Size

  • Plow Anchors – 10 lbs
  • Fluke Anchor – 4 lbs
  • Danforth Anchors – 8S, 5-H
  • Luke Anchor – 15 lbs
  • Bruce Anchor – 4.4 lbs
  • Box anchors- 13lbs

Anchor Rode

  • Recommended length: 90 feet
  • Nylon rode diameter – 7/16 inches
  • Chain rode diameter – 3/16 inches

25 to 30 Feet Pontoon Boats

The weight of these boats may reach 5000 pounds. Take a look at the following suggestions:

Anchor Size

  • Danforth Anchors – 13S, 12-H
  • Luke Anchor – 25 lbs
  • Bruce Anchor – 11 lbs
  • Plow Anchor – 15 lbs
  • Fluke Anchor – 7 lbs
  • Box anchors- 19 lbs

Anchor Rode

  • Recommended length: 135 feet
  • Chain rode diameter – 1/4 inches
  • Nylon rode diameter – 7/16 inches

30 to 35 Feet Pontoon Boats

These are some of the heaviest boats on the water, weighing up to 10,000 pounds, and also large pontoon boats. As a result, you’ll be able to boat in challenging conditions. You will, of course, require an additional large and best anchor.

Anchor Size

  • Plow Anchor – 20 lbs
  • Fluke Anchor – 7 to 10 lbs
  • Danforth Anchors – 22S, 12-H
  • Luke Anchor – 35 to 40 lbs
  • Bruce Anchor – 11 to 16.5 lbs
  • Box anchors- 25 lbs

Anchor Rode

  • Chain rode diameter – 5/16 inches
  • Recommended length: 190 feet
  • Nylon rode diameter – 1/2 inches

35 to 40 Feet Pontoon Boats

The majority of pontoon boats aren’t much bigger than this. These boats have a weight limit of 15,000 pounds. As a result, the relative pontoon boat anchor is the most powerful. The following are some ideas:

Anchor Size

  • Bruce Anchor – 11 to 16.5 lbs
  • Luke Anchor – 50 lbs
  • Danforth Anchors – 22S, 12-H
  • Fluke Anchor – 7 to 10 lbs
  • Plow Anchor – 20 lbs

Anchor Rode

  • Recommended length: 225 feet
  • Chain rode diameter – 3/8 inches
  • Nylon rode diameter – 9/16 inches

Pontoon boat anchors are essential for securing your pontoon boat. You might find yourself drifting away from your intended location or, worse, trapped if you don’t have the best anchor.

Boat Anchor

 

Pontoon Anchor Servicing

Cleaning

It is critical to clean and maintain your pontoon anchor system to ensure that it functions correctly and does not rust. If you reside in a region with a lot of salt water, you should service your pontoon anchor at least once a year.

Remove any mud, sand, or debris that may be sticking to your pontoon anchor before servicing it. Scrub the anchor clean with a brush and some water. Once it’s clean, lubricate it with WD-40 or another lubricant to keep it from rusting.

It’s critical to properly store your pontoon anchor once you’ve serviced it. Wrap it in an old towel and store it somewhere dry and ventilated is the best method to accomplish this.

New Rope or Chain

Your pontoon anchor rope or chain will deteriorate as it ages. This is especially true if you live in a saltwater-rich location. You should maintain your pontoon anchor rope diameter or chain at least once a year to extend its life.

It’s time to replace your pontoon anchor rope or chain if you find it’s starting to show symptoms of wear. Pontoon anchor rope or chain may be purchased at most boating stores or online.

Make sure you purchase the right size and length for your pontoon anchor rope or chain when replacing it. If you choose a pontoon anchor rope or chain that is too short or too tiny, it will be difficult to anchor your pontoon boat.

Proper Use

It’s just as crucial to use your pontoon anchor appropriately as it is to have the best anchor. Follow these guidelines to make sure you’re utilizing your pontoon anchor correctly:

  • Use a pontoon anchor rope or chain that is the right size and length for your pontoon boat.
  • Before each usage, inspect your pontoon anchor to ensure that it is not damaged and that the rope or chain is in excellent working order.
  • Allow enough pontoon anchor rope or chain to be let out while anchoring so that your pontoon boat may securely float without striking the bottom.
  • When handling your pontoon anchor, be careful since it might be sharp and inflict damage.

Pontoon owners can ensure that they’re utilizing their pontoon anchor appropriately and keeping their pontoon boat safe by following these guidelines.

An important aspect of boating safety is anchoring your pontoon boat. You can assist in guaranteeing that your best pontoon boat remains put and doesn’t drift away by selecting the suitable pontoon anchor and properly operating it. Your pontoon anchor can survive for many years if you treat it with care. You may learn more about pontoon boats in these articles.

Pontoon Boat

Common Questions (FAQs)

What is the appropriate holding power for my boat?

The size of the anchor you’ll need for your pontoon boat is determined by the amount of holding force you’ll need. Best pontoon boat anchor size is determined by the amount of holding force necessary, not by the average-sized pontoon boat. Wind, current, and the type of bottom the pontoon boat anchors will be put in all have an impact on holding power. Our tables, on the other hand, can help you determine the anchor size and anchor rode length you’ll require.

How do you put in a pontoon boat anchor?

Pontoon anchors are installed in the same way as any other form of anchor. To begin, determine the size and length of pontoon anchor rope or chain required for your pontoon boat. The pontoon anchor rope or chain must then be attached to your pontoon boat. Finally, drop the pontoon anchor into the water and double-check that it is properly moored.

Are Anchor Rodes Necessary?

Anchor rods aren’t required, although they can come in handy in some circumstances. An anchor rode helps protect your pontoon boat from drifting if you’re anchoring in deep water or in an area with a lot of currents. Anchor rodes are also useful for tying your pontoon boat to a dock or another vessel.

How long should my anchor chain be?

The length of your pontoon anchor rope or chain will be determined by the depth of the water in which you intend to anchor. In general, the anchor chain should be at least double the length of your pontoon boat’s beam. You’ll need at least 40 feet of anchor chain if your pontoon boat is 20 feet long.

What is the best bottom for an anchor?

A sandy base is ideal for an anchor. The hull of your pontoon boat is less likely to be damaged by a sandy bottom than by a rocky bottom. Using a sharp-tipped pontoon anchor while anchoring in a rocky location is recommended. When anchoring a pontoon boat, you may also consider using a longer anchor rode.

Pontoon Boat Anchor Size

Can pontoon boats overturn?

If pontoon boat is not securely anchored, they might overturn. Use the proper pontoon anchor size for your pontoon boat and secure the pontoon anchor rope or chain to a sturdy location on the pontoon boat. Also, make sure you have enough pontoon anchor rope or chain to keep your pontoon boat afloat without striking the ground. You may assist prevent your pontoon boat from flipping by following these guidelines.

What is the difference between a pontoon anchor and a regular anchor?

Pontoon anchors are particularly built for pontoon boats. They’re generally bigger and heavier than normal anchors, with a pointed tip that helps them penetrate the ground. A longer pontoon anchor rode helps keep your pontoon boat from wandering.

How deep must the water be for a pontoon boat?

Most pontoon boats can float in as little as three feet of water. However, you should double-check the owner’s handbook for your pontoon boat to be sure. For effective functioning, certain pontoon boats require deeper water. Also, before you moor your pontoon boat, make sure to check the water depth. Make sure there’s enough water in the lake for your pontoon boat to float safely without striking the bottom.

What is the best way to beach a pontoon boat?

Pontoon boat anchors are the best technique to beach a pontoon boat. Best Pontoon boat anchors may prevent your pontoon boat from drifting and can also be used to secure it to a dock or another vessel. Use the proper pontoon anchor size for your pontoon boat and secure the pontoon anchor rope or chain to a sturdy location on the pontoon boat. Also, make sure you have enough pontoon anchor rope or chain to keep your pontoon boat afloat without striking the ground. You can assist in guaranteeing that your pontoon boat is firmly moored and will not drift away by following these guidelines.

 

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